Notice to Contributors


Manuscripts submitted to the Real Analysis Exchange should be well written and of interest to a substantial number of real analysts. Manuscripts should be submitted, preferably as pdf files to one of the Contributing Editors (See details below.) All submissions are accepted for consideration with the understanding that while being reviewed by the Real Analysis Exchange, the same work will not be under review elsewhere. The Real Analysis Exchange is divided into four sections which are described below. When submitting a manuscript, authors should specify for which section they wish to have their manuscript considered.

Authors can download the journals LaTeX class file and other LaTeX typesetting documents here.

  1. Sections of the Real Analysis Exchange

    Topical Surveys are articles giving an overview of one area of current research activity. These articles differ from survey articles in other journals both by their more limited scope and greater depth. Such articles should include a stream of mathematical thought from the origins of the topic through unpublished results. For information about writing a survey article, contact

    Professor Paul D. Humke
    Real Analysis Exchange
    Department of Mathematics
    Saint Olaf College
    Northfield, MN 55057

    Internet
    analysisr@gmail.com
    Telephone
    1-(507) 301-8475 (voice)
    1-(509) 984-3113 (fax)

    The Research Articles section is reserved for original research in areas of interest to real analysts. A list of such areas grouped by Contributing Editor can be found here. To be published as a research article a paper must be correct and contain nontrivial new results significant to the literature of real analysis.

    The Inroads section is intended for a less traditional presentation of information of interest to real analysts. Papers submitted to this section are expected to attain a high level of exposition, detailing both the results of the paper and their mathematical context. Submissions are evaluated more on their level of interest and utility than on the amount of original research they contain. Examples include:

    • a new synthesis or viewpoint of known results
    • a clever new proof of an important theorem
    • an illuminating example or counterexample
    • helpful progress on a complex problem
    • an informative historical account
    Submissions should be made to one of the Contributing Editors.

analysis@stolaf.edu