St. Olaf CollegeAcademic CatalogSt. Olaf College

Table of Contents
An Education for the 21st Century: Academic Life
Graduation Requirements and Curricular Advice
Academic Regulations and Procedures
International and Off-Campus Studies
Special Programs
Admissions and Financial Aid
Life Outside the Classroom
People
Facts and Figures
College Calendar

Registrar's Office
Admin 224
1520 St. Olaf Avenue
Northfield, MN 55057

507-646-3015
507-646-3210 FAX
registrar@stolaf.edu

 

Please note: This is NOT the most current catalog.

Music

http://www.stolaf.edu/depts/music/

Chair, 2004-05: Dan Dressen, voice, fine arts

Faculty, 2004-05: Anne Adams, voice, diction; Jason Alfred, piano; Steven Amundson, orchestra, conducting, theory; Kathryn Ananda-Owens, piano; Anton Armstrong, choir, conducting, voice; Linda Berger, music education, theory; Marianne Bryan, piano pedagogy; David Carter, cello, chamber music, art of music, string methods; Mary Ellen Childs, composition; Beth Christensen, music librarian; Anna Clift, cello; Donna Dixon, voice; Andrea Een, violin, viola, chamber music; Julia Elkina, piano; Alison Feldt, voice, vocal pedagogy, vocal literature; John Ferguson, organ, church music, choir, chapel cantor; Helen Foli, violin, viola; Charles Forsberg, theory, composition; Kenneth Freed, violin, viola; Yakov Gelfand, piano; Jan Gilbertson, music education; Tracey Gorman, voice; Loretta Graetz, music education; Charles Gray, violin, viola, chamber music; David Hagedorn, jazz, percussion, theory, percussion methods; Alice Hanson, music history; J. Robert Hanson, trumpet; Janis Hardy, voice, lyric theater; Martin Hodel, theory, trumpet; Gerald Hoekstra, music history, early music ensembles; Anthony Holt, voice; Sigrid Johnson, choir, voice; Scott Kallestad, saxophone, woodwind methods; Mark Kelley, bassoon; Jill Mahr, handbell ensembles; Timothy J. Mahr, band, conducting, composition, music education; Dennis Malmberg, music education; Mary Martz, voice; Harriet McCleary, voice; Keith McCutchen, choir, jazz piano; James McKeel, voice, lyric theater; Kent McWilliams, piano; Karrin Meffert-Nelson, clarinet; Justin Merritt, composition, theory; Elinor Niemisto, harp; Paul Niemisto, band, low brass, brass methods, music education; Paul Ousley, string bass; Nancy Paddleford, piano; Dione Peterson, music education; Michael Petruconis, French horn; Jo Ann Polley, clarinet, orchestra; Catherine Rodland, organ, theory; Margaret Rowland, theory; Kay Sahlin, flute; Robert Scholz, choir, voice, conducting, choral literature; Miriam Scholz-Carlson, string methods; Mark Seerup, oboe; Ray Shows, violin, viola; Robert Smith, voice, vocal literature; Karen Solgard, hardanger fiddle; Cynthia Stokes, flute; A. DeWayne Wee, piano; Theo Wee, organ, piano; Paul Westermeyer, church music; Herbert Winslow, French horn; Larry Zimmerman, low brass

Inspired by the conviction that music is a divine gift, the St. Olaf College Music Department devotes itself to the cultivation of this gift in the lives of its students and in the broader community. We dedicate ourselves to creating an educational experience that unites the artistic standards of a professional program with the intellectual rigors and academic breadth of the liberal arts in an environment of free, creative and critical inquiry. Through music we affirm the college’s mission to foster the development of the whole person in mind, body and spirit.

The Music Department offers extensive opportunities to explore, practice and celebrate the musician’s art with an ongoing commitment to a distinctive ensemble program, excellent individualized instruction and a comprehensive undergraduate music curriculum. We honor St. Olaf’s rich heritage spanning more than a century of international artistry and scholarship and will continue to cultivate a spirit of exploration and innovation, seeking and celebrating the transcendent and transforming power of music.

GENERAL EDUCATION CREDIT

Among the courses that meet the Artistic and Literary Studies requirement of the General Education curriculum are: Performance Studies (lessons in voice and instruments), The Art of Music, The Music Spectrum, World Music, Orchestral Music, Music in the Electronic Medium, History of Jazz, America’s Hit Parade, Russian Music and The Music of Indonesia.

DEGREES OFFERED

The Music Department offers Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) and Bachelor of Music (B.M.) degrees, which are accredited by the National Association of Schools of Music:

Bachelor of Arts Degree in Music

This is a liberal arts degree, with approximately one-third of the course work in music. It is available in general music studies or with a teaching credential or with an emphasis in history-literature or theory-composition. The breadth of study of a liberal arts degree offers students a wide range of career options in music and related fields. Examples include performance, broadcasting, multimedia, arts administration, advertising, education, arts journalism, music librarianship or music therapy. This degree also prepares students to pursue graduate study. Students are admitted to the program by audition, either as part of their application process or after beginning their studies at St. Olaf.

Bachelor of Music Degree

This is a professional music degree with approximately two-thirds of the course work in music. Students are admitted to the program by audition, either as part of their application process or after beginning their studies at St. Olaf.

1. Bachelor of Music in Performance

Students with this degree often continue with graduate work in preparation for careers in performance or private and college teaching. This degree is also a good base for an advanced degree in such fields as pedagogy and music therapy. Piano and organ performance majors may also pursue an emphasis in collaborative keyboard performance.

2. Bachelor of Music in Church Music

Students in this program usually go on to graduate school or directly into parishes as church musicians. They may also pursue careers in conducting or college teaching or attend seminary to prepare for the ordained ministry.

3. Bachelor of Music in Theory-Composition

After receiving this degree, students typically continue with graduate study. Other options include work in film music or other media, teaching or conducting.

4. Bachelor of Music in Music Education

This degree typically leads to a public school teaching career immediately after graduation, although graduate study is an option as well.

Admission to the Music Major

Students wishing to pursue a music major (either B.A. or B.M. degree) are required to audition on their principal instrument/voice, complete an examination covering basic music knowledge and have their keyboard skills assessed. Students may apply for entrance into the music major before enrolling at St. Olaf or after beginning their studies here. Credit for lessons taken before being accepted into the major may count toward the major. For more information, please contact the Music Department.

Lesson Fees

The lesson fee is $300 $320 per semester for each weekly half-hour lesson (0.25 credit). [Refund policy: The fee is refundable only if the student drops the course by the first fifth day of the semester. No refund is given thereafter.]

CANDIDATES FOR TEACHER EDUCATION

Applications for the Music Education program, both B.A. and B.M., are processed in the second semester of the sophomore year. All prospective music education students are classified as B.A. music majors until that time.

Before applying to the Teacher Education program, the student must have completed or be enrolled in Music 112 (Ear Training II), Music 114 (Theory II), and Music 251 (Conducting). The application procedure includes a performance in a recital and examinations in conducting (Music 251).

Students are reviewed for continuance in the Teacher Education program, usually in the first semester of the junior year. The continuance procedure includes a performance in a recital, examination in conducting (Music 252 or 253), piano and guitar proficiency and observations of teaching behavior, which are assessed in Education 330 (Principles of Education). A student not approved for continuance in the program is no longer in that program.

Students whose principal performing instrument is piano must perform only on their secondary instrument/voice (i.e., the one pertaining to music education licensure) in recital during the entrance and continuance semesters. They will be assessed on piano via the regular jury system.

Teacher licensure requirements may change at any time. If you plan to obtain a teaching license, you are advised to consult with the Education Department, Music Education Adviser(s) and department web pages to ensure that you meet all current requirements.

SPECIAL PROGRAMS

Music Ensembles

All full-time students are eligible to audition for membership in the musical ensembles of the college:

Vocal Ensembles: St. Olaf Choir, Chapel Choir, St. Olaf Cantorei, Early Music Singers, Manitou Singers, Viking Chorus, Gospel Choir, Collegiate Chorale

Instrumental Ensembles: St. Olaf Band, Norseman Band, St. Olaf Orchestra, St. Olaf Philharmonia, Collegium Musicum and Jazz Ensembles. Additional opportunities in ensemble performance include Clarinet Choir, Flute Choir, Handbell Ensembles, Horn Club, Percussion Ensemble, Trombone Choir and Tuba-Euphonium Ensemble.

Master of Arts in Sacred Music (Luther Seminary)

This cooperative program with Luther Seminary, St. Paul, Minn., prepares persons for service in the church as professional, theologically educated, pastoral musicians. For more information, contact Luther Seminary at (651) 523-1609 / www.luthersem.edu/admissions/degrees/firsst/msm.shtm.

REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL BACHELOR OF ARTS MUSIC MAJORS

  1. General Education Requirements for All Bachelor of Arts Music Majors:
    The General Education requirements of the college must be met by all B.A. music majors. See Index for details.

  2. Music Course Requirements for All Bachelor of Arts Music Majors:
    Ear Training, Sightsinging and Keyboard 111, 112, 211 (0.25 each); Improvisation and Aural Skills 212 (0.25); Theory 113, 114, 213, 214 (0.75 each); History-Literature 241, 242; one course selected from the following: History-Literature 341, 342, 343, 344, 345 (the three history-literature courses together meet the Music Department’s requirement for writing in the major).

  3. Performance Studies Credit, Level and Practice Requirements for All Bachelor of Arts Music Majors:
    Performance studies course credit is 0.25, Course Level I, for a weekly half-hour lesson and six hours of practice per week, one hour per day. Performance study transferred from the Bachelor of Music program to the Bachelor of Arts program retains its original value.

  4. Performance Requirements for All Bachelor of Arts Music Majors:
    Two solo performances on a student recital, of which one must be in the junior or senior year. Students must be registered for lessons on the instrument/voice on which they perform in a recital during the semester of the performance.

  5. Ensemble and Recital Attendance Requirements for All Bachelor of Arts Music Majors:
    Four semesters of participation in an official ensemble are required. All Bachelor of Arts music majors are required to attend a minimum of 10 recitals or concerts per semester, with a minimum of 60 required for graduation. Senior music majors who have completed the requirement are not required to verify further recital attendance. See Music Handbook for details.

  6. Admission to the Major:
    Students wishing to pursue a music major (either B.A. or B.M. degree) are required to audition on their principal instrument/voice, complete an examination covering basic music knowledge and have their keyboard skills assessed.

  7. S/U Policy:
    All music courses that fulfill a requirement of the Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in music (including all required courses for the teaching credential or for emphasis in history-literature or theory-composition) must be taken as graded courses; they may not be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory (S/U) basis.

A. Requirements for the Major

  1. Requirements for All Music Majors in the Bachelor of Arts Program (listed above).
  2. Additional Music Course Requirements:
    Performance Studies, six semesters (0.25 each), with four on the same instrument/voice.
    One additional course selected from the following: Analysis 313, 314, Counterpoint 222, Composition 223, History-Literature 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, World Music 237.

B. Requirements for Bachelor of Arts Music Major with Teaching Credential

This degree leads to K-12 certification and may be pursued with instrumental or vocal specialization.

  1. Requirements for All Music Majors in the Bachelor of Arts Program (listed above).
  2. Additional Music Course Requirements:
  3. Performance Studies, principal performing area, minimum of six semesters (0.25 each) required for graduation. Once a student is admitted to the Bachelor of Arts Music Education program, Performance Studies on the principal instrument must continue in every semester of study except the professional semester. For instrumental specialization, the principal performing area must be brass, percussion, string, woodwind or piano; for vocal specialization it must be voice or piano. For students with voice as the principal perfoming medium, the first semester of study may be voice class.

    Performance Studies, secondary performing area, two or four semesters (0.25) (see item 7 below).

    Conducting 251 (0.5); The Child and Adolescent Voice 365 (0.25); World Music 237.

Instrumental Specialization:
Conducting 253 (0.5); Instrumental Techniques 166, 167, 168, 169 (0.25 each); Instrumentation 221 (0.5); Voice or Voice Class, one semester (0.25) and at least one semester of participation in a choral ensemble.

Vocal Specialization:
Conducting 252 (0.5); Vocal Pedagogy 364 (0.25); Choral Literature I 287; Instrumentation 220 (0.25) (or 166, 167, 168, and 169).

Music Methods Courses:
Education 355, 356 (0.5), and 359 (0.5) (instrumental specialization) or 358 (0.5) (vocal specialization).

  1. Professional Education Courses:
    Education 231 (0.0), 290, 291, 330, 372 (0.5), 375 (0.5), 381 (0.5), 382 (0.0), 385 (0.5), 389 (3.0). For additional requirements and/or changes in teacher licensure requirements since the printing of this catalog, please see the Education Department.

  2. Additional Non-Music Course Requirements:
    1.0 course, Art or Theatre; 0.25 course, Dance Technique.

  3. Performance Requirements:
    The two solo performances (see “Performance Requirements for all Bachelor of Arts Music Majors”) must be on the student’s principal instrument/voice. In addition, two performances are required on a student recital in a small ensemble in the student’s area of certification (instrumental or vocal). See Music Handbook for details.

  4. Requirements for Secondary Performing Area and Keyboard and Guitar Proficiency:
    Students must have two semesters (0.25 each) of a secondary performing area, except in the following cases:
    • Instrumental specialization: Students with piano as the principal performing area must have four semesters (0.25 each) of a brass, percussion, string or woodwind instrument as the secondary area.
    • Vocal specialization: Students who have piano as the principal performing area must have four semesters (0.25 each) of voice as the secondary area.

    For students with voice as the secondary performing area, the first semester of voice may be voice class, except for students with vocal specialization and piano as the principal performing area. For students with piano as the secondary performing area, up to two semesters of piano class may be counted toward the requirement.

  5. Keyboard and Guitar Proficiency Requirement:
    Students must pass a keyboard proficiency exam (which includes sight-reading, harmonization and performance) or earn a B or higher in Music 261, Practical Skills for Keyboard Proficiency, and they must pass a guitar proficiency exam.

  6. Ensemble Requirements:
    Once a student is admitted to the Bachelor of Arts Music Education program, participation in an official ensemble is required in every subsequent semester of study except the professional semester. Ensemble participation must be in the area of certification (instrumental or vocal).

  7. Program Admission and Continuance:
    See Candidates for Teacher Education above. Consult the Music Education Adviser(s).

C. Requirements for Bachelor of Arts Music Major with History-Literature Emphasis

  1. Requirements for All Music Majors in the Bachelor of Arts Program (listed above).

  2. Additional Music Course Requirements:
    Performance Studies, six semesters (0.25 each), with four in the same instrument/voice. Voice class can serve as the first semester of study if voice is the principal area of study.

    Three courses selected from the following: History-Literature 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, World Music 237; one course selected from the following: Counterpoint 222, Analysis 313, 314.

  3. Senior Writing Portfolio:
    During the final semester the student must submit to the music history faculty a portfolio of at least three papers previously submitted for Level III music courses. One of these papers must be revised with faculty supervision in order to demonstrate the student’s best work in research and historical inquiry.

  4. Program Admission:
    Students wishing to pursue this program must register with a member of the music history faculty before the end of the junior year, preferably earlier. In addition, students should must complete an application in the Music Office.

D. Requirements for Bachelor of Arts Music Major with Theory-Composition Emphasis

  1. Requirements for All Music Majors in the Bachelor of Arts Program (listed above).

  2. Additional Music Course Requirements:
    Performance Studies, six semesters (0.25 each), with four in the same instrument/voice. Voice class can serve as the first semester of study if voice is the principal area of study.

    Instrumentation 221 (0.5); Composition 223; Music in the Electronic Medium 225 (Interim); two courses selected from the following: Counterpoint 222, Analysis 313, 314, Composition 324, either 325 or a second semester of 324.

  3. Requirements for Keyboard Proficiency:
    Theory-composition majors must have four semesters of keyboard or demonstrate adequate keyboard facility by examination.

  4. Program Admission:
    Students wishing to pursue this program should consult with a member of the theory-composition faculty and complete an application in the Music Office.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR OF MUSIC DEGREE

A. Requirements for All Bachelor of Music Students

  1. General Education Requirements for All Bachelor of Music Majors:
    First Year Writing (FYW) — one course; Courses with Writing (WRI) — four courses; Foreign Language (FOL) — completion of a second semester course or proficiency examination (Vocal performance majors must complete a second semester course or proficiency examination in each of two foreign languages, one of which must be French or German.); Oral Communication (ORC) — one course (fulfilled by Education 330); Mathematical Reasoning (MAR) or Studies in Natural Science (NST) (lab not required) — one course; Physical Activity (PHA) — two courses (0.25 each) (for Music Education students one of these must be in Dance Technique); Historical Studies in Western Culture (HWC) or Literary Studies (ALS-L) — one course; Multi-Cultural Studies (MSC-G or MSC-D) — one course or one component; Biblical Studies (BTS-B) — one course; Theological Studies (BTS-T) — one course; Studies in Human Behavior and Society (HBS) — one course; Ethical Issues (EIN) — one course.

  2. Music Course Requirements for All Bachelor of Music Majors:
    Ear Training, Sightsinging and Keyboard 111, 112, 211 (0.25 each); Improvisation and Aural Skills 212 (0.25); Theory 113, 114, 213, 214 (0.75 each); History-Literature: 241, 242; one course selected from the following: History-Literature 341, 342, 343, 344, 345 (the three history-literature courses together meet the Music Department’s requirement for writing in the major); World Music 237; Conducting 251 (0.5).

  3. Ensemble Participation and Recital Attendance Requirements for All Bachelor of Music Majors:
    All Bachelor of Music students must participate in an official music ensemble every semester they are in the program. All music majors are required to attend a minimum of 10 recitals or concerts each semester, with a minimum of 60 required for graduation. Senior music majors who have completed the requirement are not required to verify further recital attendance. See Music Handbook for details.

  4. S/U Policy:
    Music courses that fulfill a requirement of the Bachelor of Music degree cannot be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory (S/U) basis.

B. Requirements for Bachelor of Music Performance Majors

  1. Requirements for All Bachelor of Music Students (listed above).

  2. Additional Music Course Requirements:
    Performance Studies, principal performing area: Once a student is admitted to the Bachelor of Music Performance program, Performance Studies (1.00 credit) on the principal instrument must continue in every semester of study. The performance major must accrue a minimum of six semesters of 1.00 credit lessons in the principal instrument.

    Performance Studies, secondary performing area: four semesters (0.25 each); one course selected from the following: Analysis 313, 314, Composition 222, 223, History-Literature 341, 342, 343, 344, 345.

    Wind and Percussion Instrument Majors Only: Instrumental Chamber Music 275, two semesters (0.25 each); Music Electives: 2.5 courses (cannot include lessons beyond the stated requirement).

    String Instrument Majors Only: Instrumental Chamber Music 275, two semesters (0.25 each); String Literature and Pedagogy Music 368 (0.50). Music Electives: two courses (cannot include lessons beyond the stated minimum requirement).

    Piano Majors Only: Piano Pedagogy 361 (.50 0.25); Music Electives: 2.50 2.75 courses (cannot include lessons beyond the stated minimum requirement).

    Voice Majors Only: Lyric Diction 263, 264 (0.25 each); Vocal Solo Literature 281, 282 (0.25 each); Vocal Pedagogy 364 (0.25); Music Electives: 1.75 courses (cannot include lessons beyond the stated minimum requirement).

    Other Majors: Music Electives: 3 courses (cannot include lessons beyond the stated minimum requirement).

    In areas with small enrollment, pedagogy and literature competencies are fulfilled by Independent Study. In these cases, the music elective requirement is reduced by one course.

  3. Performance Studies Credit, Level and Practice Requirements:
    A weekly one-hour lesson in the principal performing area counts as 1.0 course per semester, Course Level I, until the fifth semester of study of 1.0 credit lessons, when it earns Level II credit. The minimum practice requirement is two hours per day for voice majors and three hours per day on all other instruments.

    All other performance study is 0.25 for a weekly half-hour lesson, Level I. The minimum practice requirement is one hour per day.

    Performance study transferred from the Bachelor of Arts program to the Bachelor of Music program retains its original value. In the semester that a Performance major is admitted to the program, the double lesson credit in the principal performing area may be made retroactive to the beginning of the semester if the student’s course load allows and the practice requirement has been fulfilled.

  4. Performance Requirements:
    Two solo student recital performances on the principal performing instrument/voice; a half recital or three additional solo student recital performances on the principal performing instrument/voice in the junior year; and a full recital on the principal performing instrument/voice in the senior year. (The student must successfully pass a pre-recital jury exam prior to the senior recital.)

    Students must be registered for lessons on the instrument/voice on which they perform in a recital during the semester of the performance.

  5. Requirements for Secondary Performing Area and Keyboard Proficiency:
    Performance majors must have four semesters (0.25 each) in a secondary performing area. Majors in performance areas other than keyboard must have four semesters (0.25 each) of piano, organ or harpsichord as the secondary performing area, but may substitute another instrument or voice if they have adequate keyboard facility, as demonstrated by examination. Up to two semesters of piano class can count toward the requirement if piano is the secondary area.

    Two semesters of voice class can count toward the requirement for performance majors with voice as secondary area.

  6. Program Admission and Continuance:
    Prospective students are admitted based on an audition in the principal performing area and a musicianship examination.

    Students already enrolled at the college are admitted based upon performance in a student recital, a Level III jury exam and written evaluations from all music faculty who have worked with the student. Application for entrance into the program must be completed and returned to the Music Office by October 15 for processing in Fall Semester or by March 15 for processing in Spring Semester. Applications received after those dates will be processed the following semester.

    Performance majors are generally reviewed for continuance at the end of the third semester in the program. A student not approved for continuance in the program is no longer in that program.

C. Requirements for Bachelor of Music Church Music Majors

Students seeking this degree have the choice of organ or choral emphasis.

  1. Requirements for All Bachelor of Music Students (listed above).

  2. Additional Music Course Requirements:
    Performance Studies, principal performing area:
    • Organ emphasis: Once a student is admitted to the Bachelor of Music Church Music program with an organ emphasis, Performance Studies (1.00 credit) on organ must continue in every semester of study. The church music-organ major must accrue a minimum of six semesters of 1.00 credit lessons in Organ Performance Studies.
    • Choral emphasis: Once a student is admitted to the Bachelor of Music Church Music program with a choral emphasis, Performance Studies (1.00 credit) in voice must continue in every semester of study. The church music-choral major must accrue a minimum of six semesters of 1.00 credit lessons in voice Performance Studies.
      Performance Studies, Secondary performing area: four semesters (0.25 each); Conducting 252, and either 253 or 354 (0.5 each); Vocal Pedagogy 364 (0.25); The Child and Adolescent Voice 365 (0.25); Choral Literature 287, 288 (0.5 each); Music in Christian Worship 235 (Interim); Church Music Practicum 391, 392 (0.25 each); one course selected from the following: Analysis 313, 314, Counterpoint 222, Composition 223, History-Literature 341, 342, 343, 344, 345.

  3. Performance Studies Credit, Level and Practice Requirements:
    A weekly one-hour lesson in the principal performing area is 1.0 course per semester, Course Level I until the fifth semester of study of 1.0 credit lessons when it earns Level II credit. The minimum practice requirement is three hours per day for organ (organ emphasis) and two hours per day for voice (choral emphasis).

    All other performance study is 0.25 for a weekly half-hour lesson, Course Level I. The minimum practice requirement is one hour per day.

    Performance study transferred from the Bachelor of Arts program to the Bachelor of Music program retains its original value. In the semester that a Church Music major is admitted to the program, a double lesson credit in the principal performing area may be made retroactive to the beginning of the semester if the student’s course load allows and the practice requirement has been fulfilled.

  4. Performance Requirements:
    Two solo student recital performances on the principal performing instrument/voice; a half recital or three solo student recital performances on the principal performing instrument/voice in the junior year; and a full recital in the senior year, with at least 50% on the principal performing instrument/voice. (The student must successfully pass a pre-recital jury exam prior to the senior recital.) Students must be registered for lessons on the instrument/voice on which they perform in a recital during the semester of the performance.

  5. Requirements for Secondary Performing Area:
    Church Music majors with organ emphasis must have four semesters (0.25 each) of voice as the secondary area; those with choral emphasis must have four semesters (0.25 each) of a keyboard instrument as the secondary area. If voice is the secondary area, the first semester of study may be voice class. If keyboard is the secondary area, the first two semesters of study may be piano class.

  6. Program Admission and Continuance:
    Prospective students are admitted based on an audition in their principal performing area and a musicianship examination. Students already enrolled at the college are admitted based upon performance in a student recital, a Level III jury exam and written evaluations from all music faculty who have worked with the student. Applications for entrance into the program must be completed and returned to the Music Office by Oct. 15 for processing in Fall Semester or by March 15 for processing in Spring Semester. Applications received after these dates will be processed the following semester. Church Music majors are generally reviewed for continuance at the end of the third semester in the program. A student not approved for continuance in the program is no longer in that program.

D. Requirements for Bachelor of Music Theory-Composition Majors

  1. Requirements for All Bachelor of Music Students (listed above).

  2. Additional Music Course Requirements:
    Performance Studies: at least six semesters (0.25 each), with four on the same instrument/voice; Theory 313, 314; Composition 222, 223, 324, either 325 or a second semester of 324; Conducting 252, 253 (0.5 each); Instrumental Techniques 166, 167, 168, 169 (0.25 each); Instrumentation 221 (0.5); Music in the Electronic Medium 225 (Interim); Musical Acoustics, Physics 252 (Interim); two courses selected from the following: History-Literature 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, an additional Level II or III Music Interim.

  3. Performance Studies Credit, Level and Practice Requirements:
    Performance study receives 0.25 credit for a weekly half-hour lesson, Course Level I. The minimum practice requirement is one hour of practice per day.

  4. Performance Requirements:
    Two performances in a student recital, of which at least one must be in the junior or senior year. Students must be registered for lessons on the instrument/voice on which they perform in a recital during the semester of the performance.

    A presentation of original works in a recital. Performances of these works can be done on one recital or on several recitals. In the latter case, the music should, when taken together, comprise a substantial musical concert program. Each student should discuss how this requirement will be met with the theory/composition faculty no later than the fall semester of the senior year.

  5. Requirements for Keyboard Proficiency:
    Theory-Composition majors must have four semesters of keyboard or demonstrate adequate keyboard facility by examination.

  6. Program Admission and Continuance:
    Prospective students are admitted based on a composition portfolio and an interview with a member of the theory-composition faculty. A performance audition is optional. Theory-composition students are usually admitted to the program only after beginning their study at St. Olaf, typically after enrollment in a composition course.

    Students already enrolled at the college are admitted based on a composition portfolio, an interview with the theory-composition faculty and written evaluations from all music faculty who have worked with the student. Applications for entrance into the program must be completed and returned to the Music Office by October 15 for processing in Fall Semester or by March 15 for processing in Spring Semester. Applications received after these dates will be processed the following semester.

    Theory-composition majors are generally reviewed for continuance at the end of the third semester in the program. A student not approved for continuance in the program is no longer in that program.

E. Requirements for Bachelor of Music Music Education Majors

This degree leads to K-12 certification and may be pursued with instrumental or vocal specialization.

  1. Requirements for All Bachelor of Music Students (listed above)

  2. Additional Music Course Requirements:

    Performance Studies, principal performing area: minimum of six semesters (0.25 each) required for graduation. One semester of lessons (either the semester of or before the senior
    recital) must be taken for .50 credit.
    Once a student is admitted to the Bachelor of Music Music Education program, Performance Studies on the principal instrument must continue in every semester of study except the professional semester. For instrumental specialization, the principal performing area must be brass, percussion, string, woodwind or piano; for vocal specialization it must be voice or piano. For students with voice as the principal perfoming medium, the first semester of study may be voice class.

    Performance Studies, secondary performing area: two or four semesters (0.25 each) (see item 7 below);

    The Child and Adolescent Voice 365 (0.25); one course selected from the following: Analysis 313, 314, Counterpoint 222, Composition 223, History-Literature 341, 342, 343, 344, 345.

    Instrumental Specialization: Conducting 253 and either 252 or 354 (0.5 each); Instrumental Techniques 166, 167, 168, 169 (0.25 each); Instrumentation 221 (0.5); Voice or Voice Class, one semester (0.25) and at least one semester of participation in a choral ensemble.

    Vocal Specialization: Conducting 252 and either 253 or 354 (0.5 each); Vocal Pedagogy 364 (0.25); Choral Literature I 287 (0.5); Instrumentation 220 (0.25) (or 166, 167, 168, and 169).

    Music Methods Courses: Education 355, 356 (0.5), and 359 (0.5) for instrumental, or 358 (0.5) for vocal. For additional requirements, see the Education Department information in this catalog.

  3. Professional Education Courses:
    Education 231 (0.0), 290, 291, 330, 372 (0.5), 375 (0.5), 381 (0.5), 382 (0.0), 385 (0.5), 389 (3.0); For additional requirements and/or changes in teacher licensure requirements since the printing of this catalog, please see the Education Department.

  4. Additional Non-Music Course Requirements:
    1.0 course, Art or Theatre; 0.25 course Dance (technique).

  5. Performance Studies Course Credit, Level and Practice Requirements:
    Performance study receives 0.25 credit for a weekly half-hour lesson, Course Level I. The minimum practice requirement is one hour of practice per day.

  6. Performance Requirements:
    Two solo performances on a student recital on the principal instrument/voice, at least one in the junior or senior year; a half recital in the senior year on the principal instrument/voice; two performances on a student recital in a small ensemble in the area of the student’s concentration (instrumental or vocal). See Music Handbook for details. Students must be registered for lessons on the instrument/voice on which they perform a recital during the semester of the performance.

  7. Requirements for Secondary Performing Area:
    Music Education majors must have two semesters (0.25 each) of a secondary performing area, except in the following cases:

    • Instrumental Music Education majors who have piano as the principal performing area must have four semesters (0.25 each) of a brass, percussion, string or woodwind instrument as the secondary area.
    • Vocal Music Education majors who have piano as the principal performing area must have four semesters (0.25 each) of voice as the secondary area.

      For students with voice as the secondary performing area, the first semester of voice may be voice class, except for vocal music education majors with piano as the principal performing area. For students with piano as the secondary performing area, up to two semesters of piano class may be counted toward the requirement.

  8. Piano and Guitar Proficiency Requirement:
    Students must pass a keyboard proficiency exam (which includes sight-reading, harmonization and performance) or earn a B or higher in Music 261, Practical Skills for Keyboard Proficiency, and they must pass a guitar proficiency exam.

  9. Ensemble Requirements:
    Once a student is admitted to the Bachelor of Music Music Education program, participation in an official ensemble is required in every subsequent semester of study except the professional semester. Ensemble participation must be in the area of certification (instrumental or vocal).

  10. Program Admission and Continuance:
    See Candidates for Teacher Education above. Consult the Music Education Adviser(s).

F. Requirements for a Bachelor of Music Organ or Piano Performance Major with Collaborative Keyboard Performance Emphasis

  1. Requirements for All Bachelor of Music Organ or Piano Performance Students (listed above).

  2. Additional Music Course Requirements:
    Vocal Solo Literature I 281 (0.25), Vocal Literature II 282 (0.25), two semesters of Instrumental Chamber Music 275 (0.25, 0.25), Performance Studies — Collaborative Piano (1.0), one course (1.0) selected from the following: Opera Workshop 269, Lyric Diction I 263 (0.25), Lyric Diction II 264 (0.25), Choral Literature I 287, Choral Literature II 288, additional Performance Studies — Collaborative Piano, additional Instrumental Chamber Music 275.

  3. Performance Requirements:
    Two collaborative performances on a student recital, of which one must be in the junior or senior year. Students must be registered for lessons in collaborative piano at the time of performance in order for this requirement to be fulfilled.

  4. Program Admission:
    Students wishing to pursue this program should consult with a member of the piano or organ faculty and complete an application in the Music Office.

DISTINCTION

Senior music majors, upon nomination by a music faculty member and a two-thirds majority vote of the Music Department faculty, are eligible for departmental distinction in Music and will be advised of this fact by October 1 of their senior year.

Senior candidates wishing departmental distinction are required to do a special project in their major area of emphasis. Examples of projects include: a full recital (Performance and Church Music); a major paper (History-Literature); a substantial composition (Theory-Composition); a student teaching portfolio (Music Education). Exceptions to the typical distinction project will be considered by the Music Department faculty. A music faculty member must approve the project and serve as project advisor.

For each senior project, the department chair will solicit three faculty members who will serve on an evaluation committee. Each member of the committee assigns a letter grade to the project along with a recommendation and comments which are shared with the full music faculty. A two-thirds majority vote of the Music Department faculty in favor of granting distinction is required.

COURSES

MUSIC PERFORMANCE STUDIES

Music performance studies provide the student direct access to the experience of thinking in music. They integrate aspects of music’s cultural and historical contexts, its theoretical properties and the physical and psychological character of performance.

For the non-music major, half-hour lessons are offered weekly for 0.25 credit. Course expectations include six hours of practice per week at one hour per day, participation in studio classes and attendance at four recitals or concerts per semester.

Lessons are available in bassoon, clarinet, cornet, euphonium, flute, English horn, French horn, hardanger fiddle, harp, harpsichord, oboe, organ, percussion, piano, jazz piano, saxophone, string bass, trombone, trumpet, tuba, viola, violin, violoncello and voice.

Students register for lessons in the Music Office, prior to college registration dates. The lesson fee is $300 for each 0.25 credit.

Refund policy: The fee is refundable only if the student drops the course by the first day of the semester. No refund is given thereafter.

MUSIC COURSES

111 Ear Training, Sightsinging and Keyboard I (0.25)
Students explore dictation and singing of intervals, rhythmic patterns, scales, tonal melodies and basic chord progressions. Keyboard activities include improvising accompaniments; playing scales, intervals, cadences and chord progressions; and accompanying melodies. With 113, this course forms the introduction to the music major. Offered Fall Semester.

112 Ear Training, Sightsinging and Keyboard II (0.25)
Building on principles learned in 111, students encounter more advanced rhythmic patterns, tonal melodies and chord progressions. Keyboard activities include harmonizing melodies, realizing figured basses and playing chord progressions. Prerequisites: Music 111 and 113. Offered Spring Semester

113 Theory I (0.75)
In this course, students explore the fundamentals of music, including the elements of pitch and rhythm, music notation, intervals, triads and inversions, seventh chords, scales, harmonic progression and basic principles of voice leading. With 111, this course forms the introduction to the music major. Offered Fall Semester.

114 Theory II (0.75)
Building on principles learned in 113, students develop a harmonic vocabulary through analysis of seventh chords, secondary functions and common chord modulation. Studies in melody explore species counterpoint, develop through melodic reduction and phrase structure. Binary and ternary forms are also studied. Prerequisites: Music 111 and 113. Offered Spring Semester.

130 The Music Spectrum
Designed for students with little or no background in music, this course introduces the fundamentals of music materials through the keyboard, computer programs and written work in music theory. Offered during Interim.

131 The Art of Music
Students learn fundamental music materials and a perspective of music history as well as develop techniques of listening to aid in the critical perception and fuller enjoyment of the musical art. The course has a required activity fee. Generally offered in the Spring Semester.

132 Orchestral Music
In this course, students explore orchestral music, its history, forms, styles, instrumentation, vocabulary and specific landmark works. The course includes two orchestral concerts in Minneapolis/St. Paul. Offered during Interim.

161 Piano Class I (0.25)
Designed to complement the music major’s understanding of music theory through group instruction in beginning piano, this course emphasizes sight-playing, basic chord patterns and scales by using multi-key reading. Offered Fall Semester. Open to non-majors on a space-available basis only.

162 Piano Class II (0.25)
Piano Class II continues the instruction begun in Music 161. Prerequisite: Music 161. Offered
Spring Semester.

163 Alexander Technique (0.25 credits)
This course addresses both the theory and the practical application of F. M. Alexander’s discoveries of the process of human coordination. Students learn to apply the Alexander Technique to their practice and performance activities. Offered during Spring Semester.

164 Voice Class (0.25)
Through group instruction, students encounter the fundamentals of singing and an introduction to song literature. Class performance is required. This course may be repeated once. Offered every semester.

166 Brass Class (0.25)
Intended primarily for music majors, this course introduces basic techniques for performance on the trumpet, horn, trombone, euphonium and tuba. Each student develops a basic proficiency on any three of these instruments. Pedagogical techniques, repertoire, literature and instrument maintenance are also included. Students play a solo with piano accompaniment and perform with the class ensemble at the end of the term. Offered Spring Semester.

167 Percussion Class (0.25)
Intended primarily for music majors, this course introduces basic techniques for performance on all instruments of the percussion family, with an emphasis on the snare drum. Students also study instrument maintenance and minor repair. Offered Spring Semester.

168 String Class (0.25)
Intended primarily for music majors, this course introduces basic techniques for performance on the violin, viola, cello and string bass. Students are also introduced to instrument maintenance and minor repair. Offered Fall Semester.

169 Woodwind Class (0.25)
Intended primarily for music majors, this course introduces basic techniques for performance on selected instruments in the woodwind family. Tone production and technical facility are highlighted. Discussion topics include posture, breathing, embouchure, history of the woodwind instruments, instrument families, reed adjustment, maintenance and basic repair, resource materials, method books, solo and ensemble editions and similarities and differences in teaching the various woodwind instruments. Offered Fall Semester.

211 Ear Training and Keyboard III (0.25)
This course continues to develop the basic skills of sightsinging, dictation and keyboard taught in 111, Ear Training I, and 112, Ear Training II. Sightsinging includes melodies with chromatic pitches and modulation. Greater emphasis is placed on harmonic dictation and both keyboard and dictation exercises employ more complex harmonies. Prerequisites: Music 112 and 113. Offered Fall Semester.

212 Aural Skills and improvisation (0.25)
This course continues the aural study of chromatic harmony, melodies and 20th-century rhythms introduced in Music 211. Students also work on basic improvisation skills, including working from jazz chord symbols, improvising melodies from given guidelines, improvising cadenzas and improvising jazz melodies. Prerequisites: Music 211 and 213. Offered Spring Semester.

213 Theory III (0.75)
Continuing the theory sequence from 114, students explore Baroque counterpoint, Classical and Romantic styles and forms, advanced modulation techniques and chromatic harmony. The course also introduces musical acoustics and music technology. Prerequisites: Music 112 and 114. Offered Fall Semester.

214 Theory IV (0.75)
Building on principles learned in 213, students examine the techniques and materials of music since 1875, including chromaticism and extended tonality. Analysis of late 19th- and 20th-century music is included. Prerequisites: Music 211 and 213. Offered Spring Semester.

220 Instrumentation (0.25)
Intended for students in vocal music education, this course introduces fundamental characteristics of orchestral and band instruments, including orchestration, instrument ranges and transposition. Prerequisite: Music 114 and junior standing. Offered Fall Semester.

221 Instrumentation (0.5)
Through this introduction to the practical fundamentals of orchestration, students learn about instrument ranges, nomenclature, proper notation, characteristics of orchestral and band instruments, transposition and scoring for various instrumental combinations including full orchestra, concert band and marching band. Prerequisite: Music 114 and junior standing. Recommended: Music 166, 167, 168, 169, or equivalent experience. Offered Fall Semester.

222 Counterpoint
The study of counterpoint is a way of understanding more completely the compositional techniques of great composers as well as developing one's own fluency in writing music. Students learn advanced contrapuntal techniques in Renaissance, Baroque and 20th-century styles, studying the works of such composers as Palestrina, Bach and Barber. Prerequisite: Music 214. Offered Fall Semester, 2005-06, and alternate years.

223 Composition I
Students are introduced to a number of compositional techniques and are given opportunities to create original works of music and hear them performed. This course also includes listening to important 20th-century works and discussing current trends in music, the changing role of the composer in society and practical composition issues. Prerequisite: Music 112, 114, or permission of instructor. Generally offered every semester.

225 Music in the Electronic Medium
This course is a hands-on study of the science, aesthetics, history and current practice of electronic music. Creative projects include work with MIDI synthesizers and sequencers, as well as digital sampling and software synthesis. Offered during Interim, 2003, and alternate years.

231 History of Jazz
This course presents a study of the historical development of jazz, from its roots in blues and ragtime at the turn of the century to the present, focusing on its principal forms and styles, its role in American culture and contributions of major artists. Offered during Interim.

232 America’s Hit Parade
This course is an introduction to American sacred, art, folk and popular music from ca. 1650 to the present. Selected music “hits” from each genre and era will be examined for their distinctive musical styles and forms as well as for what they reflect about American culture and values. Intended for non-music majors, the course will cover basic listening skills, vocabulary and forms. The ability to read musical scores is helpful but not required. Offered during Interim.

234 Russian Music
This course examines the characteristic musical styles and forms of Russian folk, sacred and art music since the 18th century. Intended for the non-music major, the course offers an introduction to the fundamentals of music listening, terminology and basic analysis of form and provides a framework for the discussion of Russian music and its social, political and cultural connotations. Offered during Interim.

235 Music in Christian Worship
Students study the musical history of hymnody and its relationship to the history of the church. In addition, this course explores the Biblical Psalms and their use in the worship of the church and includes references to their musical settings in Gregorian chant, Anglican chant, responsorial settings and choral music. Offered during Interim 2005 and alternate years.

237 World Music
An introduction to non-Western music, this course explores ethnically diverse performance practices and styles, ethnomusicological techniques for studying non-Western music and the relationship of music of various cultures to events important to those cultures. Offered Fall Semester.

238 The Music of Indonesia
This course explores the music of Indonesia and helps students gain knowledge and awareness of its social and cultural context. Students acquire basic skills in playing Javanese gamelan (a gong and chime instrument) music and study the history, geography, economy, sociology and cultures of Indonesia as a nation-state. Offered periodically during Interim.

241 History and Literature of Music I
Students encounter the history and development of Western European music from the Middle Ages to ca. 1750 and study the genres and styles of music from monophonic chant to concerted music of the Baroque. Prerequisite: Music 114. Offered Fall Semester.

242 History and Literature of Music II
Continuing the study begun in 241, students encounter the history and development of Western European music from ca. 1750 to the present and study the major forms, styles and representative literature of the Classic and Romantic eras and the 20th century. Prerequisite: Music 114. Offered Spring Semester.

251 Conducting (0.5)
Students learn basic conducting gestures, with and without baton, through exercises in meter patterns, preparatory beats and cut-offs, cueing, dynamics, fermata, articulations, phrasing, left hand independence and face/eye usage. Prerequisite: Music 114 or permission of instructor. Offered Spring Semester.

252 Choral Conducting (0.5)
Students learn conducting techniques for choral literature including rehearsal techniques, vocal preparation and auditioning and selecting voices. Course work includes observation of conductors on campus and in the community. Prerequisite: Music 251. Offered Fall Semester.

253 Instrumental Conducting (0.5)
Students learn conducting techniques for instrumental literature, including rehearsal techniques, score preparation and reading the full score. They study characteristic examples from standard band and orchestra literature and receive practical experience in conducting an instrumental ensemble. Course work includes observation of conducting faculty. Prerequisite: Music 251. Offered Spring Semester.

261 Practical Skills for Keyboard Proficiency (0.25)
This course is designed for music education students, who will learn to harmonize simple melodies by ear, transpose songs, sight-read music of moderate difficulty and read various kinds of musical scores. Students earning a grade of B or higher in Music 261 will meet the department’s keyboard proficiency standards for music education. Offered both semesters.

263 Lyric Diction I (0.25)
Students study and practice principles for singing in English and Italian with good pronunciation, enunciation and expression. Course content includes phonetic analysis using the International Phonetic Alphabet and identifying and exercising the phonemic features of English and Italian through class performances and listening assignments. Prerequisite: two semesters of voice lessons. Offered Fall Semester, 2004-05, and alternate years.

264 Lyric Diction II (0.25)
Students study and practice the principles for singing in French and German with good pronunciation, enunciation and expression. Course content includes phonetic analysis using the International Phonetic Alphabet and identifying and exercising the phonemic features of French and German through class performances and listening assignments. Prerequisite: Music 263 and two semesters of voice lessons. Offered Spring Semester, 2004-05, and alternate years.

267 Advanced Acting for the Lyric Stage (1.00 0.5)
Music 267 is a studio course focusing on advanced techniques of acting and singing for the musical stage with emphasis on opera. Students explore voice, movement, improvisation and characterization at an advanced level. They receive coaching in musical and dramatic style through solo and small ensemble literature and prepare scenes for class performance. May be repeated once. Prerequisites: two semesters of voice study and Theatre 131 (Acting for the Lyric Stage) or permission of instructor. Generally offered every Fall Semester.

269 Opera Workshop
Opera Workshop focuses on the preparation for performance of a one-act opera or opera scenes. Students will receive coaching and performance experience through individual and group singer/actor exercises. This course culminates in a public performance. Repertoire includes the Classical and Romantic operas (i.e. Mozart, Rossini, Puccini), operettas (i.e., Offenbach and Gilbert and Sullivan), contemporary operas and new works written specifically for the Opera Workshop. May be repeated once. Offered during Interim.

275 Instrumental Chamber Music (0.25)
Students study and perform chamber music repertoire for strings, winds, percussion and keyboard. Ensembles formed frequently include string quartets, woodwind quintets or brass quintets. Existing ensembles may enroll, or new groups may be formed. The course requires regular and frequent rehearsals, coaching sessions with faculty and recital performances. May be repeated: Students may earn up to one course credit, but only 0.25 per semester. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Offered every semester.

281 Vocal Solo Literature I (0.25)
Students survey the solo vocal repertoire (art song) of Germany, Italy and Spain. This course will provide the materials for the study of song literature, highlighting the significant features and developments inherent in the form. Course work will include class performances. Prerequisite: Music 263 and 264, or permission of instructor. Offered Fall Semester, 2005-06, and alternate years.

282 Vocal Solo Literature II (0.25)
Students survey the solo vocal repertoire (art song) of France, England, the United States and the Nordic countries. This course will provide the materials for the study of song literature, highlighting the significant features and developments inherent in the form. Course work will include class performances. Prerequisite: Music 263 and 264, or permission of instructor. Offered Spring Semester, 2005-06, and alternate years.

287 Choral Literature I (0.5)
This course is a study of the smaller forms of choral literature from the Renaissance to the present with an emphasis on music suitable for junior and senior high school and church choirs. Students will study scores and discuss interpretation and conducting problems. Prerequisite: Music 114 and junior standing. Offered Spring Semester.

288 Choral Literature II (0.5)
This course is a study of the larger forms of choral music from the Baroque to the present. Students will study scores and recordings and discuss interpretation and conducting problems. Prerequisite: Music 114 and junior standing. Offered Spring Fall Semester, 2005-06, and alternate years.

294 Internship

298 Independent Study

313 Analysis of Tonal Music
Analysis is a course of discovery, using advanced tools of music theory to examine the ways in which great works of music are put together. Students examine principles of form and style and, using a range of analytical techniques, come to a deeper understanding of tonal music. The course focuses on Classical and Romantic literature, with some work in 20th-century tonality. Prerequisite: Music 214. Offered Spring Semester, 2004-05, and alternate years.

314 Analysis of 20th-Century Music
An analytical study of the wide range of musical styles found in the 20th century, this course provides an opportunity to study important works from our time and to come to a deeper understanding of their structure and meaning. Students study atonal music theory in depth and examine some of the new approaches to tonality in our time. Prerequisite: Music 214. Offered Spring Semester, 2005-06, and alternate years.

324 Composition II
Students develop more advanced technique in writing for instruments and voice through individual study in creative composition, focusing on smaller ensembles. This course may be repeated. Prerequisite: Music 223. Generally offered every semester.

325 Composition III
This course continues the study in creative composition begun in 223 and 324 and includes writing for large ensembles. This course may be repeated. Prerequisite: Music 221, 223, 324, and permission of instructor. Generally offered every semester.

341 Music of the Renaissance Era
This course offers an in-depth study of the music literature and styles of the Renaissance, ca. 1430-1600. Prerequisite: Music 241, 242. Offered in alternate years.

342 Music of the Baroque Era
This course offers an in-depth study of the music literature and styles of the Baroque, ca. 1600-1750. Prerequisite: Music 241, 242. Offered in alternate years.

343 Music of the Classical and Romantic Eras
This course offers an in-depth study of the music literature and styles of the late 18th and 19th centuries. Prerequisite: Music 241, 242. Offered in alternate years.

344 Music of the 20th Century
This course offers an in-depth study of the music literature of the 20th century (ca. 1890-present). Prerequisite: Music 241, 242. Offered in alternate years.

345 Advanced Study in Music History
Students encounter in-depth studies in a specific topic or area of music history. The content and nature of this course are determined by the instructor and the department. Sample topics include American music, studies in classical music, opera and folk and pop in art music. May be repeated if topics are different. Prerequisite: Music 241, 242. Offered every semester.

354 Advanced Conducting (0.5)
Students study advanced baton techniques, including meter changes, asymmetrical meters, advanced fermata situations, pattern variety, melds and 20th-century demands (including the contemporary score and aleatoric music). Students also study the art of programming, score preparation, score reading, score interpretation, memorization, handling different stylistic traditions and conducting recitative. Students practice conducting an ensemble and observe rehearsals on and off campus. Prerequisite: Music 252 or 253, and permission of instructor. Offered Fall Semester.

361 Piano Pedagogy (0.50 0.25)
This course introduces principles and varied methods of effective and creative piano teaching, along with piano studio management. Although the focus is on teaching young beginners, the course also addresses the teaching of intermediate students. Students develop skills through actual teaching experience. Prerequisite: three semesters of piano lessons, of which the first semester may be piano class, or permission of the instructor. Offered Fall Semester, 2005-06, and alternate years.

364 Vocal Pedagogy (0.25)
This course introduces a systematic pedagogical approach to the study of voice production for use in the studio or classroom. Students examine basic voice physiology, the healthy use and care of the voice, voice problems and appropriate vocal literature. Prerequisite: three semesters of voice lessons, one of which may be voice class; or permission of instructor. Offered every Fall Semester.

365 The Child and Adolescent Voice (0.25)
This course introduces the principles of vocal pedagogy applied to the child and adolescent voice with an emphasis on understanding the developing voice and establishing good vocal habits with appropriate techniques and literature. Prerequisites: Music 251, completion of one semester of voice or voice class and junior standing, or permission of instructor. Generally offered every semester.

368 String Literature and Pedagogy (0.5)
Students study a broad range of literature from beginning to advanced, examining scores and listening to string etudes, solos, sonatas, concertos and orchestral excerpts. Special emphasis will be placed on appropriate repertoire for beginning and intermediate students. Pedagogy, discussion of well-known string performers (past and present) and the basics of studio management will be accentuated through required readings, videos, discussion and actual teaching experiences. Offered Spring Semester, 2004-05, and alternate years.

391 Church Music Practicum I (0.25)
Students study the role of music in worship with an emphasis on strategies for developing music groups, including handbells and Orff instruments, in worship and church education. Prerequisite: Music 214 or permission of instructor. Offered Fall Semester, 2004-05, and alternate years.

392 Church Music Practicum II (0.25)
This course continues the studies begun in Music 391. Students consider recruitment and music administration and composing and arranging music for worship. Prerequisite: Music 391. Offered Spring Semester, 2004-05, and alternate years.

394 Internship

398 Independent Research
Independent Study and Research are available in many areas not regularly taught.