2006-2008 Theme: Global Citizenship

Semester 2 Theme

Civic Engagement and the Liberal Arts
The call to citizenship is more than a simple exhortation to "get involved." We face a complex world filled with ambiguous issues.  The critical reflection of the liberal arts is essential to citizens seeking thoughtful engagement. The college community will be asked to consider the public purpose of a liberal arts education.
Contact person: Dan Hofrenning (Political Science)

Semester 1 Theme

Liberal Arts in Times of War
Global citizens face a number of issues in the world community; none is more crucial than war. We will encourage college-wide reflection on the contributions of liberal arts to understanding, (a) war, its nature, origins and consequences; (b) terrorism and the war against it; (c)  morality in the initiation and conduct of war; (d) "realism," "just war,"  "holy war" and "non-violence" as competing normative traditions in the analysis of war.
Contact person: Edmund Santurri (Religion)

Africa

India

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Global Theme Events Calendar. Semester 2, 2008


Jan. 15-16, 2008 focuslogo

Focus the Nation Teach-In:
Civic Engagement, Global Citizenship
and Global Warming
More>>


Thursday, Jan. 24  
7 p.m.
Buntrock Commons
Viking Theater

Is Global Community Possible?
Larry Rasmussen '61, St. Olaf regent and the Reinhold Niebuhr Professor Emeritus of Social Ethics at Union Theological Seminary.

Rasmussen will address the questions: What can global citizenship mean apart from global community? Since global community does not exist in any firm form, what does St. Olaf's theme actually mean? What are the chances for the evolution of global community?


Wednesday, Feb. 13  
7 p.m.
Buntrock Commons
Viking Theater

 

The New Green Movement
Students from St. Olaf, Carleton and other Minesota colleges will speak about their experiences at Powershift 2007, the largest youth summit on global climate change in history. Find out what is happening in Northfield and nationwide this academic year and how you can take action in your everyday life.

The 2008 Conference on
Globalization and Social Responsibility: Working for the Common Good

Friday, Feb. 22  
3:30 p.m.
Buntrock Commons
Ballroom
A moderated discussion between Javier Morillo-Alicea and Robert Muehlenkamp on work and workers in the global economy.  Muehlenkamp will be in residence on campus as a Woodrow Wilson Fellow. He has been involved in worker's rights issues for many years and teaches at the University of Maryland.  Morillo-Alicea is president of Service Employees International Union local 26 in Minneapolis and was recently a fellow at the Aspen Ideas Festival.

7 p.m.
Buntrock Commons
Ballroom

Corporate Responsibility and the UN Global Compact
Manuel Escudero, senior advisor and head of United Nations Global Compact Special Projects within the Global Compact Office of the secretary general. Escudero is also head of academic initiatives at the GCO, and previously served as head of Global Compact Networks. The UN Global Compact is the most important voluntary initiative of corporate citizenship worldwide, with more than 4500 participants, mostly companies, and with established networks in more than 80 countries.

Saturday, Feb. 23
10:15 a.m.- noon
Buntrock Commons
Ballroom

Educating Consumers: Wal-Mart, Firestone, and Worker's Rights
Bama Athreya, executive director for the International Labor Rights Fund.  Dr. Athreya is a cultural anthropologist, and will speak about her work in Cambodia, Indonesia, and China on the issues of child labor and worker education programs

10:15 a.m.- noon
Buntrock Commons
Ballroom

Breakout sessions, hosted by St. Olaf's social science departments, will explore different aspects of the conference theme.


Thursday, Feb. 28

11:30 a.m.
Buntrock Commons
Black and Gold
Ballroom

Civic Engagement in a Diverse World
William Galston, College Park Professor at the University of Maryland School of Public Policy; senior fellow: in governance studies at The Brookings Institution; deputy assistant to the president for domestic policy during the first Clinton administration.

Galston will discuss his book, Liberal Pluralism: The Implications of Value Pluralism for Political Theory and Practice, with specific reference to questions of civic engagement. In a diverse world, how can we develop engaged citizens?


Monday, March 10
7 p.m.
Buntrock Commons
Sun Ballroom
Vocations of Global Citizenship
Hear a panel of alumni with international careers tell their stories. They will talk candidly about how their career developed, what their work entails, and the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to build a successful international career.

March 31-April 13
Dittman Center
Flaten Art Gallery
Expanding Oceans
Mary Edna Fraser, artist, and Dr. Orrin Pilkey, geologist, are collaborating on a book with the same title. See Fraser's batiks about the rising oceans in the Flaten Art Museum gallery and learn about the great barrier reefs in the Gould Library at Carleton College.

Tuesday, April 22

3:15 p.m.
Buntrock Commons
Viking Theater

Educating Citizens
Elizabeth Beaumont, professor of political science at the University of Minnesota and former research scholar at the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching in Stanford, Calif.

Beaumont has co-authored two books that have explored the civic missions of colleges and universities. She probes the ways in which academic institutions educate for political understanding and engagement when there is so much material to cover, so many intellectual skills and capacities to build, and so little time to accomplish these goals.


Thursday, April 24

7 p.m.
Holland Hall 501

Globalism: From a Macedonian Perspective
Carol Thomas, professor of history at the University of Washington.  
The lecture is co-sponsored with the departments of history and classics.

Tuesday, April 29

4 p.m.
Rolvaag 525

The Current Conversation: Modern Intellectual Periodicals and the American Public

Senior English majors Bethan Birkelo, Lauren Fischer, Lauren Melcher and Linsey Myers will discuss four of the most influential publications of our age: The Economist, The New Yorker, National Review and The New Republic. Which publication is for you? How is each editorial board covering the 2008 elections? What are those New Yorker cartoons all about? This interactive presentation will answer your questions. Refreshments provided courtesty of the English Department.


Wednesday, April 30

6:30 p.m.
Holland Hall 501

The Vietnam War: America's Allies 33 Years Later

Alum and community activist Yee Chang '96 and Northfield Human Rights Commissioner Vice-Chair Judy Dirks will mark 33 years since the U.S. left Vietnam. Asian Studies seminar students Jay Xiong '09, Houachee Yang '08, and Sandy Yang '09 will present their findings on the mass human right abuses in post-war S.E. Asia.

Schedule of Events for Semester 1, 2007

Monday, Sept. 3

2:15-5 p.m.
See Week One booklet for locations
First Class
Faculty-led discussion of texts on
liberal arts, war and global citizenship.

Thursday, Sept. 6
11:10 a.m.
Boe Chapel
Opening Convocation
Liberal Arts, General Petraeus and the Counterinsurgency Manual
The opening convocation address will be given by Professor Edmund Santurri, professor of religion and philosophy, director of the Great Conversation and coordinator for fall semester global theme events.

Monday, Sept. 17
11:30 a.m.
Buntrock Commons Viking Theater

Student Panel Discussion:
Constitutional Limits in Times of War

Vera Belazelkoska '09, Josh Clapp '09, Sharon Grawe '08, Jason Teiken '10, and Ishanaa Rambachan '08 will serve as panelists. After opening remarks by each panelist, questions will be taken from the audience. Professor o f Political Science, Douglas Casson, organizer of the panel, will moderate.


Thursday, Sept. 20
11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Buntrock Commons Viking Theater

Literatures of Terrorism: Wordsworth, Dostoevsky, Camus, Khadra, and the Presnyakov Brothers
Faculty Panel Discussion:
Jolene Barjasteh, romance languages; Jonathan Hill, English; Anna Kuxhausen, history; Marc Robinson, Russian; and Edmund Santurri, religion.


Thursday, Sept. 27
11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Buntrock Commons Ballroom
The Role of the Academic in Times of War
David Little, professor of the practice of religion, ethnicity, and international conflict at Harvard Divinity School and former senior scholar in religion, ethics and human rights at the  United States Institute of  Peace in Washington, D.C.

Saturday, Sept. 29
 

9:15-10:30 a.m.
Buntrock Commons 142

The Moral Evaluation of Terrorism
In contemporary American political debate, few are inclined to dispute the claim that terrorism, in itself, is morally wrong, however just the grievances of a terrorist group (where "terrorism" is understood as the use of violence against noncombatant populations for some political purpose). Yet in current philosophical discussions, some thinkers do challenge this claim and argue that terrorism might be justified morally under certain conditions. Join Edmund N. Santurri, professor of religion and philosophy and director of The Great Conversation, in a discussion of the moral evaluation of terrorism.

Tuesday, October 9
7 p.m.
Buntrock Commons Viking Theater

Terrorism, Common Crimes and Community Policing
George Kelling, professor at the Rutgers-Newark School of Criminal Justice, is a leading expert on policing issues, community policing, the relationship between fear, crime and disorder, and urban crime. He is co-developer of the "broken windows" theory, which has had a nationwide impact on the policies and practices that unite communities with police.


Wednesday, Oct. 17
4:30 p.m.
Buntrock Commons 142
Sergeant John Kriesel, Minnesota National Guard, will talk about his experiences as a citizen soldier in Kosovo and Iraq.

Friday, Oct. 19
7 p.m.
Buntrock Commons Viking Theater
The Battle of Algiers
Full-length feature film.

Tuesday, Oct. 23
 
7 p.m.
Buntrock Commons Ballroom
New Face of War: Challenges to Moral and Legal Limits on War
James T. Johnson, professor of religion and member of the graduate program in political science at Rutgers University.

Friday, Oct. 26
7 p.m..
Buntrock Commons Viking Theater
Breaker Morant
Full-length feature film.

Monday, Oct. 29
10:10 a.m.
Boe Chapel
Thinking Faith-Fully About War: part 1
Anne Groton, professor of classics, presents the first of four chapel talks relating to the theme of Liberal Arts in Times of War

Tuesday, Oct. 30
7 p.m.
Boe Chapel
Lecture  by General George Sada, former Iraqi General under Saddam Husseinand current spokesperson for the Iraqi prime minister.

Thursday, Nov. 1
4:30 p.m.
Buntrock Commons Viking Theater

The War over Jihad:  What does 'jihad' really mean?
Sohail Hashmi, associate professor of international relations and alumnae foundation chair in the social sciences at Mount Holyoke College.

For at least the past two centuries, Muslims and non-Muslims have argued over how to define and to implement this central concept in Islam. The controversy often pits Muslim against Muslim and non-Muslim against non-Muslim as much as it does Muslim against non-Muslim. Since the 9/11 attack on America, the war over jihad has raged in this country. It has been waged by students, journalists, politicians, clergy, novelists and many academics. So what does "jihad" really mean, and how should American colleges and universities deal with this controversial subject?


Monday, Nov. 5
10:10 a.m.
Boe Chapel
Thinking Faith-Fully About War: Part 2
Todd Nichol, professor of Scandanavian-American studies, presents the second of four chapel talks relating to the theme of Liberal Arts in Times of War

Monday, Nov. 12
10:10 a.m.
Boe Chapel
Thinking Faith-Fully About War: Part 3
Gary Stansell, professor of religion, presents the third of four chapel talks relating to the theme of Liberal Arts in Times of War

Thursday, Nov. 15
 

11:30 a.m.
Buntrock Commons
Viking Theater

From Obscurity to Trinity: Why a Handful of
Academics Developed the First Atomic Bomb and Changed the World

Jason Engbrecht, assistant professor of physics at St. Olaf.

Monday, Nov. 19
10:10 a.m.
Boe Chapel
Thinking Faith-Fully About War: Part 4
Ed Langerak, professor of philosophy, presents the last of four chapel talks relating to the theme of Liberal Arts in Times of War

Thursday, Nov. 29
 
11:30 a.m.
Dittmann Center
305
Preserving Pain, Promoting Peace: Learning from the Memorial Sites at Hiroshima, Nanjing, and My Lai
Karil Kucera, Luce Assistant Professor of Asian Visual Culture, St. Olaf Departments of Asian Studies and Art History.
 

More events will be added as scheduling details are finalized.

For more information, contact Edmund Santurri
Religion Department
507-786-3084