EndNote

Your tool for downloading, compiling and using bibliographic records
Your tool for managing PDF files of scanned documents 
Fully integrated with Microsoft Word
Page last updated 19 September 2007 | St. Olaf College Libraries

EndNote Highlights:

1. EndNote is a bibliographic and file management tool for academics

  • EndNote libraries are organized by author, date, title or any other tag you desire
  • Various work forms are provided for material types and are easily edited
  • Libraries are searchable by keyword
  • Libraries can hold links to your journal articles saved in PDF format (e.g. JSTOR articles you’ve saved on your computer)
  • Many databases have imbedded software so that search results can be downloaded in EndNote-compatible format. 

Sample Library Screen:

 

 

2. EndNote is designed for use with Microsoft Word and Word Perfect

  • Packages may be brought up simultaneously to facilitate in-text citations and compilation of bibliographies for papers or to compile stand-alone bibliographies.
  • Changing citation formats (e.g. from APA to MLA) is possible with the click of a key. 
  • EndNote provides manuscript templates for major journals and style sheets.
  • EndNote works with Word to allow imbedding figures, photos, film clips, etc. along with captions into your text. 

Using EndNote


Set-up
Linking PDF Documents
Practice Set:  Asian Studies
Compiling Entries Manually Compiling Annotated Bibliographies Practice Set:  Film Studies
Importing References from Saved Searches Writing Papers with Word and EndNote Practice Set:  Organic Chemistry
Downloading using the "Connect" function
Practice Set: 
Sports and Writing
Practice Set:  Biology

A.  Set up your own EndNote library on your machine

1.  On a Mac with OS X, double click on the hard drive and then double click on the Applications folder. Double click the EndNote X folder. Then double click the EndNote X icon. 
You may also install EndNote on your personal machine by following these instructions from the IIT department

Create your own personal library with the introductory screen or by clicking on File -> New.  Name your library and save it on the server (H: drive, etc.) or wherever you maintain your own materials.  It will now be available to you on any public machine on campus.

Bring the Toolbar into view:  Tools -> Customize Toolbar -> A display of icons will appear. Simply drag and drop them onto your library.  

Choose the style manual or type:  Go to the pull down menu on the tool bar and look at the list provided.  If the one you want is not listed, highlight "select another style."  This might take a minute as it's loading many, many styles.  One by one, choose those styles you will most commonly use (probably MLA [Modern Languages Association], Annotated MLA, APA published [American Psychological Association],  PS220Turabian for Analyzing Politics, or for the Bio 125 assignment, the journal Cell.   You then may choose your current style from those choices in the Current Style box on the toolbar by highlighting it.   

From now on, you should launch EndNote as described above but you will only need to open your library. 

B.  Compile your own Library of References

You may build a library of citations using EndNote in three ways:  1) by typing them in yourself; 2) by saving a search from an online database to your computer, and then importing the records into your EndNote library; or 3)  by using EndNote's searching and downloading capabilities directly in databases.

1.  Manual Entries


 For items you already have in hand (that is, if you have a paper copy of a journal article), you need to enter the reference yourself.  For example, if you found an article in the Journal of Organic Chemistry:

  • Click on the, "New Reference" icon on the toolbar or use the References dropdown menu and choose "New Reference"


  • Choose the type of source you have on the drop-down menu under "reference type"; in this case the first option is a journal article.
  • Fill in the applicable boxes.  Boxes can be left blank.
    • For authors, put in last name first, then a comma, then first name and initial OR first name, middle name or initial and family name.  Use the enter key so the names of each author are listed on separate lines.  If there is a corporate author (e.g. an organization or government agency) or people end their name with Sr., Jr, etc., end the entry with a comma.
    • For titles of articles in journals, essays in books or of books themselves, it is best to use upper and lower case as the style you use most calls for. This means if you generally use APA style, you should only capitalize the first word in the title, the first word of the subtitle if there is one and any proper nouns. If you usually use MLA format, all nouns are capitalized  EndNote will decide whether to italicize, use quotation marks or underline titles -- you should just give it the basic words. 
    • Page numbers can be entered fully (604-635) or in shortened form (604-35; leaving off the second 6) -- EndNote will choose the correct form and adapt your entry.  NOTE:  
    • If you have a full-text article from an electronic source (e.g. Academic Search Premier or JSTOR) after the page numbers, type the database name and the date accessed.  It will then appear in the appropriate place in the citation.
    • Editions should be listed in numerical format (e.g. 2nd) rather than written out.  EndNote will add the word edition as needed.
    • If you wish to write an annotation, put it in the notes field.  At this point, the notes field is only activated in the Annotated MLA style and in the PS220 Turabian Annotated style (i.e. annotations won't print in Word if you choose another style).  If you need to write annotations in a format other than MLA or Turrabian, please email Charles Priore, Kris MacPherson, or Ken Johnson (reference librarians)
    • You may add as much material as you wish (e.g. notes, call numbers, etc.)  This will help you as you go back to recheck items as you write.  The extra material won't show up in the reference unless the style calls for it.
  • When you are finished entering, click the "X" to close the entry box.  The author, year and title should show up in the main library box, highlighted, and the reference at the bottom as a "preview."  If the preview is not there, click the preview button on the lower right corner.
  • Completed references can be edited by highlighting the entry and pressing enter, or by double-clicking on the highlighted entry.

2.  Importing References Saved from Non-EndNote Searches


When you search an online journal index or database directly from the Libraries home page or from a Research Guide prepared for your class (with hot links to databases), you can often save the results of your search and then import them into your EndNote Library.  For explicit instructions for each index/database, look on the Electronic Research Tools page and consult instructions linked under the index name.  Note:  Some databases are not set up for downloading references so links are not given.   Citations from those databases must be entered manually as in number 1.

  • From the St. Olaf and Carleton Library catalog, Bridge:
  •  
    • Do a search on Bridge in the normal way.
    • Mark the records you wish to save and click the "Save Marked Records" box at the bottom of the page as you browse each page OR click on "Save all on page." If you have only one relevant record, mark it by simply clicking the "save records" button.
    • Then click on  View/Export Saved button
    • In the box, make sure you click on EndNote on the left, and send the material to Local Disk on the right

    • Click Submit and click on okay. 
    • Save to the desktop (temporarily) or to your EndNote materials folder on the H: drive/Sven (you decide when to delete).  We recommend you change the name of the file to reflect your topic or resource uses and date searched but you must use the correct file extension (as noted in the directions from the Indexes/Abstracts page; usually .txt .  Reduce your screen or exit Bridge.
    • On the EndNote toolbar, click on the Import button (the curving arrow).

    • Click on choose file and highlight the one you saved on the desktop or H: drive/Sven.  Click "open."
    • Click on Import Option menu, and then Bridge (or "other filters" if it's not there; scroll down to Bridge, highlight it and return).
    • In the Duplicates box, leave at Import All if you want to examine everything or discard duplicates if you trust it to do the discarding.
    • In the Text Translation box, leave it at No Translation.

    • Click the import button.
    • EndNote now shows you just the new references, so you can review them before adding them to the rest of your library.  If you wish to delete any, simply highlight it, click the References button above, and highlight Delete.
    • When you are ready, click on References, and then Show All References to see the full library.
    • Before leaving the public lab, make sure you delete all imported files from the desktop.
  • From online databases available from the Libraries Electronic Research Tools page or from the online version of your class Research Guide which have filters available on EndNote
  •  
    • First look at the name of your index/database on the Libraries Indexes page.  Those indexes from which material can be downloaded automatically have Endnote Instuctions listed below the title.
    • Follow the instructions given to run and save search. We recommend you change the name of the file to reflect your topic or resource uses and date searched but you must use the correct file extension (as noted in the directions from the Indexes/Abstracts page; usually .txt .
    • In EndNote, Click the import button (look for an arrow pointing down on the toolbar or choose import from the File menu).  Click on "Choose File."  Choose the appropriate file from the desktop or H: drive/Sven, and click "open."
    • Under Import option, see if the database you searched is listed on the drop-down menu.  If so, highlight it.  If not, choose "other filters."  Under Other Filters, highlight the correct filter [e.g. Physical Educ Ind (CSA) or BioSci(CSA)] and click "choose."
    • Under Duplicates, leave it at "Import all" unless you really want the computer to decide which are actually duplicates.  You'll have an option to delete records later if you wish.
    • Under Text Translations, leave at "No Translation."
    • Click "Import."
    • The new items will appear on your screen.  Check several records by double-clicking on each reference  to make sure they are what you want and the data is there.  Delete if you wish by going to references -> delete.  If importing from CSA databases, you may wish to erase (or move to a different field) the journal title abbreviations which will appear after the journal title if they came along.  You may also need to change journal title words to the appropriate case.
    • When you are ready to accept the list into your full library, go to References and highlight "Show all."
    • Your new references are now incorporated into your library.
3.  Downloading Records Using the Connect Function:  Direct Searches in Databases
When you search an online journal index or database using the EndNote "connect" function, you can automatically download the records you choose onto your own computer in an EndNote compatible format without having to save searches or use filters.  However, most of these databases listed under this option have restricted access.  You can search WorldCat, Article First, the Library of Congress and most university library catalogs for free.  Please note that the search engine on WorldCat as accessed through the Libraries Home Page is much more powerful than the EndNote searching mechanism.  It may be preferrable to search WorldCat using the system in #2 -- your choice.
    • Go to the connect icon .   Highlight the database you wish to search, and click connect. 

    Search using the box provided.  Remember, in World Cat, the search function is much enhanced by searching from the link on the Libraries page.

    • Once the search downloads, look at each individual record.  Remember, you can double-click on the highlighted reference to call up the work form with all the data.  Edit the form if you want to change or delete material.  Delete the whole reference by going to references -> delete.

    • When your references are as you want them, highlight the ones you wish to move to your main library or  Click on "Copy all References to"  box and choose the library you wish.  They will be moved for you.  Note:  if you click control A (on a PC) to highlight all the references, it may not "unhighlight" by clicking elsewhere.  You need to use shift/click to unhighlight one or two.  Then, if you click on the unhighlighted to highlight, the rest of them will no longer be highlighted. 

     

C.  Linking EndNote Library Entries to Scanned Items in PDF Files:
Many of you will have collections of journal articles or other scanned materials stored on your computer.  You can link these to listings in your EndNote library for easy cataloging and access.  Note:make sure you have the scanned items stored in the most logical manner before you make the links.  When you name your documents, we suggest you use the author's name, year of publication and a pdf extension (e.g. Jones(2004).pdf).  Label the second article by Jones if in the same year as:Jones(2004b).pdf." 

  • Double click the EndNote record for that article, move down to the "Link to PDF" field and place your cursor there.
  • Now find the PDF you wish to link.
  • Now Drag and Drop the pdf into the field.
  • Done!
  • Users with large libraries copy their pdf's to CD's and just note the CD number and file name in one of the worksheet fields
D.  Compiling Annotated Bibliographies with EndNote

For some courses, you will be asked to compile an annotated bibliography; that is, a list of materials relevant to your topic which have paragraph-long evaluative summaries included.  To compile this bibliography: 

  • Enter the reference to your article or book into your EndNote Library as described above (either manually or by downloading from a database).

  • In the notes field, write an evaluative paragraph according to the guidelines handed out separately in class.  If there are other items in the notes field, move them to a different field or erase them.
  •  
  • To create your annotated bibliography as a Word document:
  •  
    • In EndNote, make sure you have selected the appropriate style (For MLA, use "Annotated MLA"; see "A" above if you've forgotten how to do this).
    • Open a new Word document and choose the appropriate settings for font and size.
    • In EndNote, select the references you want for your annotated bibliography by clicking on the first reference, then holding down the Apple key and clicking on the others you want.  It is best to take all the references you need at once -- otherwise you will have to manually alphabetize your bibliography later.
    • Go to the Edit drop down menu and choose "Copy formatted."
    • Reduce the size of the EndNote screen so that you can see both Word and EndNote.
    • Go to Word. In the Edit drop down menu, choose "Paste."

E.  Writing papers with Word and EndNote

Microsoft Word and EndNote are designed to work hand-in-hand.  For students and scholars, this is probably the greatest collaboration since Watson and Crick (or maybe internet shopping and credit cards).  These instructions work with Mac OS X. 

  • Open Word on your machine in normal view.  Open your EndNote library simultaneously, keeping it in the smaller view.  Make sure the correct citation style is chosen in EndNote.
  •  


  • Type your text as you would normally.  However, when you are ready to cite someone, point your cursor to the place you want your first citation to appear.  You now have several choices of how to insert:
    • In EndNote, highlight the reference you wish to cite.  In Word, go to the EndNote toolbar, click on Insert Selected Citation(s) icon. 

     

    Note that first a numbered reference will appear -- not in proper format.  The software will crank away for a bit (sometimes awhile depending on how busy the network is) the first time you insert a citation, but suddenly, the in-text reference will be correct and the bibliography reference will appear at the end of the paper.  Save your Word file and continue.  OR

    • To insert several references together, hold the Apple key down while highlighting all the references you wish to place together.  EndNote will insert them as one multiple citation and sort them according the rules of your chosen Style.
  • Sometimes,  you need to add the page number in the citation or you don't need the full data.  To modify individual citations within Word, highlight the one you wish to edit.  On the EndNote toolbar, click the "Edit citation" button to open the Edit box.
    • Excluding the author's name:  If the author and reference already are fully identified in the context of the sentence and page numbers are not needed, no additional in-text citation is necessary (MLA 5.4.1).  Check the "Exclude Author" box.  In this way, the reference will not appear in as an in-text citation, but will be included in the full works-cited list. 
    • Excluding the year of publication:   If you have chosen a style other than MLA, the year may be included in the in-text citation.  If you have referred to the year in the text, you may not need it in the citation.
    • Adding prefixes and suffixes:  In some cases, it is appropriate to add words such as "qtd. in" or "for example" or "see" before the author's name within the citation.  Use the Prefix box to include these words using your citation style for capitalization and punctuation (MLA 5.4.7).  Suffixes are less commonly used.
    • Adding page numbers:  When you are citing a specific page or section in your source, include the appropriate page numbers in the Page box (MLA 5.4.2).

If you need to change the format once you have already entered references or need to change the title of the bibliography, etc., go to the EndNote toolbar in your word document.  The "numbered list" is the "format bibliograpy" icon.  On the first screen you may switch styles; under "layout" you may retitle your bibliography.
F.  Saving and Exiting from EndNote

When you close your EndNote library it is saved automatically. The good news is you don't have to worry about forgetting. The bad news is if you really mess things up, you can't close without saving changes. If you're going to experiment in a big way, it's best to copy the original library, retitle the copy and test the new techniques there.


PRACTICE SETS 

TOPIC:  Sports and Writing

1.  Entering references manually.  Enter the following based on the instructions above.  Use MLA format.

  • Encyclopedia article or an article in a book:  From the second edition of the Handbook of Sport Psychology (edited by Robert N. Singer, Heather A. Hausenblas and Christopher M. Janelle; published in 2001 by John Wiley and Sons of New York), an article called Youth in sport:  Psychological considerations, written by Robert J. Brustad, Megan L. Babkes and Alan L. Smith, on pages 604-635.  Call number of the book is R.R. GV 706.4 .H37 2001.

  • Book:   A book called Worldwide Trends in Youth Sport by Paul De Knop, published by Human Kinetics in Champaign, Illinois in 1996.

  • Journal article: From the May 1991 issue (volume 91, number 5) of a journal called The Elementary School Journal you've chosen an article entitled, Burnout in youth sports" written by  Robert J. Rotella, Tom Hanson and Richard H. Coop. It's on pages 421-429.
  • A Web page: http://www.competitivedge.com/intro.html  Go to this web page and find the information you need (author, title, date last updated, date you accessed, etc.)
If you chose MLA format, your previews should look like these:
  • Brustad, Robert J., Megan L. Babkes, and Alan L. Smith. "Youth in Sport:  Psychological Considerations." Handbook of Sport Psychology. Eds. Robert N. Singer, Heather A. Hausenblas and Christopher M. Janelle. 2nd ed. New York: John Wiley and Sons, 2001. 604-35.
  • De Knop, Paul. Worldwide Trends in Youth Sport. Champaign: Human Kinetics, 1996.
  •  
  • Rotella, Robert J., Tom Hanson, and Richard H. Coop. "Burnout in Youth Sports." Elementary School Journal 91.5 (1991): 421-29.
  •  
  • Goldberg, Alan. Can Sports Psychology Help You Get Mentally Tough? Available: http://www.competitivedge.com/intro.html. September 23 2002.  [or the date you accessed it]
  •  
2.  Now, make up a short paragraph in Word which cites at least two items in separate sentences.  It should end up looking something like this:  [Please consider FORMAT, not CONTENT!]

Are sports a good activity for upper elementary students?  Parents must consider not only the physical impact on growing bodies, but also the psychological consequences.   The first question which may occur is whether a child is developmentally ready to play sports (Brustad, Babkes and Smith).  On the other end of the spectrum is the issue of burnout for children playing team sports (Rotella, Hanson and Coop).

Works Cited [You have to type this in if you drag references over]

Brustad, Robert J., Megan L. Babkes, and Alan L. Smith. "Youth in Sport:  Psychological Considerations." Handbook of Sport Psychology.  Eds. Robert N. Singer, Heather A. Hausenblas and Christopher M. Janelle. 2nd ed. New York: John Wiley and Sons, 2001. 604-35.

Rotella, Robert J., Tom Hanson, and Richard H. Coop. "Burnout in Youth Sports." Elementary School Journal 91.5 (1991): 421-29.
 

TOPIC:  Women in Japan

1.  Entering references manually.  Enter the following based on the instructions above.  Use MLA format.

  • Encyclopedia article or an article in a book:  From the encyclopedia, Japan:  An Illustrated Encyclopedia, published by Kodansha (of Tokyo) in 1993, an article entitled "A Woman's Place" by Susan J. Pharr and Jeannie P.C. Lo on pages 1704-1705 in volume 2.  Call number:  R.R. DS 805 .J263 1993
  •  
  • Book:  Gambling with Virtue : Japanese Women and the Search for Self in a Changing Nation by Nancy Ross Rosenberger, published in Honolulu by the University of Hawai'i Press in 2001 with 277 pages.   Call number:  HQ1762 .R68 2001
  •  
  • Journal article: In the Journal of Comparative Family Studies, Summer 1996 v27 n2 p309(21), an article called, "Rethinking the roles of Japanese women," by Hsiao-Chuan Hsia and John H. Scanzoni.
  • A web page:http://www.stolaf.edu/people/larsonph/Larson_page/Projects/Tamura_Toshiko.htm

  • Go to this web page and find the information you need (author, title, date last updated, date you accessed, etc.)
If you chose MLA format, your previews should look like these:
  • Pharr, Susan J., and Jeannie P.C. Lo. "A Woman's Place." Japan:  An Illustrated Encyclopedia. Vol. 2. Tokyo: Kodansha, 1993. 1704-05.
  • Rosenberger, Nancy Ross. Gambling with Virtue:  Japanese Women and the Search for Self in a Changing Nation. Honolulu: University of Hawai'i Press, 2001.
  •  
  • Hsia, Hsiao-Chuan, and John H. Scanzoni. "Rethinking the Roles of Japanese Women." Journal of Comparative Family Studies 27.2 (1996): 309-29.

  • Larson, Phyllis. Re-Reading Tamura Toshiko: A Failed "New Woman"? [1995]. web page. Available: http://www.stolaf.edu/people/larsonph/Larson_page/Projects/Tamura_Toshiko.htm. September 23 2002. 


2.  Now, make up a short paragraph in Word which cites at least two items in separate sentences.

It should end up looking something like this:  [Please consider FORMAT, not CONTENT!]

American interest in the roles and status of Japanese women has ranged in depth from simple curiosity to exhaustive scholarly study.  Even as long ago as the 1893 Chicago World's Fair, a 176 page pamphlet on Japanese women was prepared for the American public (Japanese Woman's Commission for the World's Columbian Exposition).  And the American debate on whether Japanese women live to their full potential has raged ever since.  Views vary from the very traditional (Hsia and Scanzoni) to the continually evolving (Pharr and Lo).

Works Cited [You have to type this in if you drag references over]

Hsia, Hsiao-Chuan, and John H. Scanzoni. "Rethinking the Roles of Japanese Women." Journal of Comparative Family Studies 27.2 (1996): 309-29.

Japanese Woman's Commission for the World's Columbian Exposition. Japanese Women. Chicago: A.C. McClurg, 1893.

Pharr, Susan J., and Jeannie P.C. Lo. "A Woman's Place." Japan:  An Illustrated Encyclopedia. Vol. 2. Tokyo: Kodansha, 1993. 1704-05. 

TOPIC:  Horror in Film

1.  Entering references manually.  Enter the following based on the instructions above.  Use MLA format.

  • Encyclopedia article or an article in a book:  From the encyclopedia, St. James Encyclopedia of Popular Culture, published by St. James Press (of Detroit) in 2000, an article entitled "Horror Films" by Steven Schneider on pages 451-453 in volume 2.  Call number:  R.R. E 169.1 .S764 2000
  • Book:  Immortal Monster:  The Mythological Evolution of the Fantastic Beast in Modern Fiction and Film by Joseph Andriano, published in Westport, CT by Greenwood Press in 1999 with 179 pages.   Call number:  PS374.M544 A53 1999

  • Journal article: In the Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media, 1994,  v38 n2 pp. 243-246, an article called, Sex and violence in slasher films:  a reinterpretation, by Daniel Linz and Edward Donnerstein.
    A web page:  http://www.classic-horror.com
    Go to this web page and find the information you need (author, title, date last updated, date you accessed, etc.)
If you chose MLA format, your previews should look like these:
  • Schneider, Stephen. "Horror Films." St. James Encyclopedia of Popular Culture. Vol. 2. Detroit: St. James Press, 2000. 451-53.

  • Andriano, Joseph. Immortal Monster:  The Mythological Evolution of the Fantastic Beast in Modern Fiction and Film. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1999.
  • Linz, Daniel, and Edward Donnerstein. "Sex and Violence in Slasher Films:  A Reinterpretation."  Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media 38 (1994): 243-46.
  • Yapp, Nate. Classic Horror:  Reviewing the History of Terror. 2003. Available: http://www.classic-horror.com. 2 November 2003.
  •  

2.  Now, make up a short paragraph in Word which cites at least two items in separate sentences.

It should end up looking something like this:  [Please consider FORMAT, not CONTENT!]

From the absurd to the stunningly real-life, horror films have long demanded a place in the American psyche.  And, as with many popular genre, a literature has grown to analyze and celebrate the variety.  From web sites providing reviews (Yapp) to scholarly analysis (Linz and Donnerstein) ….

Works Cited (You have to type this in if you drag references over)

Linz, Daniel, and Edward Donnerstein. "Sex and Violence in Slasher Films:  A Reinterpretation." Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media 38 (1994): 243-46.

Yapp, Nate. Classic Horror:  Reviewing the History of Terror. 2003. Available: http://www.classic-horror.com. 2 November 2003.

TOPIC:  Organic Chemistry

1.  Entering references manually.  Enter the following based on the instructions above.  Use Journal of the American Chemical Society format.

  • Encyclopedia article or an article in a book:  From the encyclopedia, Encyclopedia of Computational Chemistry, published by J. Wiley (of New York) in 1998 and edited by Paul von Rague Schleyer, an article entitled ["Horror Films" by Steven Schneider on pages 451-453 in volume 2].  Call number:  SciLib Ref QD39.3.E46 E53 1998
  • Book:  Environmental Organic Chemistry by Rene P. Schwarzenbach, Philip M. Gschwend and D.M. Imboden, published in Hoboken, NJ by Wiley in 2003 with 1313 pages.   Call number:  TD196.O73S39 2003

  • Journal article: In the Journal of Chemical Information and Computer Science, 1998,  v38,  pp. 1250-1253, an article called, ACD :abs:pgP dB 3.5 and ChemSketch 3.5, by Gary O. Spessard..
  • A web page:  [http://www.]
  • Go to this web page and find the information you need (author, title, date last updated, date you accessed, etc.)
If you chose JACS format, your previews should look like these:

Schyleyer, P.R.  Encyclopedia of computational chemistry; J. Wiley:  New York, 1998.

Schwarzenbach, R.P.; Gschwend, P.M.; Imboden, D.M.  Environmental  Organic Chemistry; 2nd ed.; Wiley:  Hoboken, N.J., 2003.

Spessard, G.O.  J. Chem. Infor. Comput. Sci.  1998, 38, 1250-1253.


TOPIC:  Phytoalexins [Biology]

1.  Entering references manually.  Enter the following based on the instructions above.  Use American Naturalist format.

  • Encyclopedia article or an article in a book:  From the encyclopedia, Encyclopedia of Fruit Trees and Edible Flowering Plants in Egypt and the Subtropics, published by the American University Press of Cairo  in 2000 and edited by Alfred G. Bircher and Warda H. Bircher, an article entitled ["Horror Films" by Steven Schneider on pages 451-453 in volume 2].  Call number:  SciLib SB359 .B57 2000 
  • Book:  Handbook of phytoalexin metabolism and action:  Books in soils, plants, and the environment. by , M. Daniel and R.P. Purkayastha, published in New York by M. Dekker in 1995 with 615 pages.   Call number:  QK898.P66 H35 1995

  • Journal article: In the Journal of Natural Products for 2003,  v66,  pp. 1280-1283, an article called, Complex C-glycosyl flavonoid phytoalexins from Cucumis sativus, by D.J. McNally, K.V. Wurms, C. Labbe, S. Quideau and R.R. Belanger.
  • A web page:  [http://www.]
  • Go to this web page and find the information you need (author, title, date last updated, date you accessed, etc.)
If you chose American Naturalist format, your previews should look like these:

Bircher, A. G. and W. H. Bircher.  2000.  Encyclopedia of Fruit trees and edible flowering plants in Egypt and the subtropics.  Cairo: New York, American University in Cairo Press.

Daniel, M., and R. P. Purkayastha.  1995, Handbook of phytoalexin metabolism and action:  Books in soils, plants, and the environment.  New York, M. Dekker.

McNally, D. J., K. V. Wurms, C. Labbe, S. Quideau, and R. R. Belanger.  2003.  Complex C-glycosyl flavonoid phytoalexins from Cucumis sativus.  Journal of Natural Products 66:1280-1283.


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Handout compiled by Charles Priore & Kris MacPherson with extra assistance by Perrin Bishop Wright and Toni Skalski.