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Douglas J. Beussman

 

    D. Beussman Pic   

                    Associate Professor of Chemistry
                    St. Olaf College
                    1520 St. Olaf Ave.
                    Northfield, MN 55057


                    Office phone: 507-786-3429
                    Fax: 507-786-3968


                        Email: beussmad@stolaf.edu







 

Educational Training                                                    Previous Experiences

Publications                                                                Research Interests

 



Courses Taught at St. Olaf College


Chemistry 106: Forensic Science  (Lecture only)
This course introduces the fundamentals of forensic science. Lectures focus on how samples are collected and analyzed and what information can be obtained. Actual case studies will be used to supplement lectures. Topics will include hair analysis, paint analysis, drug screening, arson investigation, ballistics, DNA analysis and fingerprint analysis. This course is also available with a laboratory component, as Chemistry 107.

Chemistry 107: Forensic Science with Lab
In addition to the in-class experience shared with Chemistry 106 and described above, this course offers a laboratory component with experiments that feature the use of forensic techniques to collect and analyze evidence, including fingerprinting, drug analysis, arson investigation, DNA fingerprinting and fiber analysis. Students attend three classes and one 3-hour laboratory per week.

Chemistry 255/256: Analytical Chemistry (255 - Lecture, 256 - Lab)
Students not only investigate the theory of modern analytical chemistry, but also examine the statistical treatment of errors, equilibrium, activities, acid/base chemistry, spectroscopy, electrochemistry and separations. Students taking this course use computers for solving problems. The accompanying lab course, Chemistry 256, illustrates the topics discussed in Chemistry 255. Students enrolled in this lab course practice techniques of modern analytical chemistry using state-of-the-art instrumentation, including pH meters, liquid chromatographs and a variety of spectrophotometers. Data acquisition via computer-interfaced instrumentation and electronic record-keeping is emphasized. Students practice and develop group skills by working in “companies” throughout the semester.

Chemistry 378/382: Instrumental Analysis (378 - Lab, 382 - Lecture)
Students study how instruments function mechanically, mathematically, optically and electronically and then how the parts are linked together. Topics covered include basic electronics and computer interfacing, spectrophotometric instruments, mass spectrometers, electrochemical instrumentation and various separation methods. Students explore analytical applications, problem solving and understanding how people and instruments operate together to make things happen. Laboratory experiments demonstrate how systems of amplifiers detect signals, how computers acquire, process and display data, how chemical instrumentation is used to solve problems, and how a lab robot is used to prepare samples and do analyses.

Chemistry 384: Bioanalytical Chemistry
This course will introduce the fundamentals of bioanalytical chemistry, the application of modern analysis techniques to biological samples. Current clinical applications and examples of biological problems will be used to supplement lecture material. Topics will include biological mass spectrometry, radiochemical and immunological assays, various forms of chromatography, gel and capillary electrophoresis, electrochemical analysis and proteomics. Daily lectures will be closely integrated with laboratory experiences. Hands-on laboratory experiments will involve using different types of chromatography to separate biological mixtures in various ways, 1-dimensional and 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and ELISA assays. Several experiments will allow students to use the Chemistry Department’s new electrospray mass spectrometer to identify proteins and determine the amino acid sequence of peptides.

Chemistry 375: Advanced Laboratory
Students work on special projects during one morning or afternoon of laboratory per week. Projects may include proteomics-based research using the department's LC-MS or MALDI-TOF instruments, development of methods for forensic analysis, or development of lab experiments to be used in Forensic Science Lab, Analytical Chemistry Lab, Instrumental Analysis Lab, or Bioanalytical Chemistry Lab. Permission of instructor is required.

Chemistry 398: Independent Research
Students work on special projects during two mornings or afternoons of laboratory per week. Students may be expected to perform scientific literature research in the library or from on-line sources and may have reading to do outside of scheduled lab time. Projects may include proteomics-based research using the department's LC-MS or MALDI-TOF instruments, development of methods for forensic analysis, or development of lab experiments to be used in Forensic Science Lab, Analytical Chemistry Lab, Instrumental Analysis Lab, or Bioanalytical Chemistry Lab. Permission of instructor is required.


 

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Last modified: February 5, 2008















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